Okefenokee Joe Enterprise

MARCH 2024

Welcome! NEW, OKEFENOKEE JOE FAN CLUB members! - to the OFFICIAL OKEFENOKEE JOE NEWSLETTER.

If you're already part of the OKEFENOKEE JOE email crew, why not take your experience up a notch? Joining our FAN CLUB is easy and it's all about celebrating our shared passion for OKEFENOKEE JOE. Subscribe today and let's make this journey even more exciting together!

This month's FAN CLUB, we're bringing you more of what you love with JOE'S SNAKE LECTURES, PART II & III. Sit back, relax, and soak in JOE'S wisdom as he shares fascinating insights about snakes, bears, alligators, and more. It's an exclusive opportunity just for you, our dedicated fan base.

But wait, there's more! As a special thank you for your ongoing support, we've dug up a rare treat from the archives - a bonus music video titled 'Wintertime Truce.' It's our little way of saying thanks for being an OKEFENOKEE JOE FAN CLUB member!

So, what are you waiting for? Join us today and let's keep the excitement going!

Cheers,

David Flood - Partner - Okefenokee Joe Enterprise
 



Don't forget to get your FREE SONG! DOWNLOAD AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS NEWSLETTER, THE SONG ‘HANGIN' AROUND MY POND' by OKEFENOKEE JOE! 

~ EARTH DAY EVERY DAY!

 

 

HANGIN' AROUND MY POND

   There’s an Anhinga hangin’ around my pond

I see him everyday dryin’ his wings in the sun

Long gawky neck, jerky moves

But look at him,  he thinks he’s cool

And I’m glad that that Anhinga likes my pond

 

There’s a Great Blue Heron hangin’ around my pond

And that’s his tree from dusk ‘til early dawn

I can see him right now not far from me

Oh, what a joyful sight to see

And I’m glad that Great Blue Heron likes my pond

 

There’s fish, and frogs, and turtles in my pond

There’s cypress trees, and titi in my pond

And everything that should be can be found

It’s all around

For God has truly blessed me and my pond

 

The water’s clean and healthy in my pond

The plants and wild flowers love this fertile ground

And all God’s creatures great and small

Are welcome here one and all

And I’m so glad they like it around my pond

 

There’s raccoons, deer, and squirrels around my pond

And happy songbirds sing around my pond

And everything that should be can be found

It’s all around

For God has truly blessed me and my pond

 

That’s why you’ll find me hangin’ around my pond

 

Words & Music by Okefenokee Joe

Purchase "Swampwise Secret, Songs, And Stories from the Land of the Trembling Earthand other really awesome stuff in the Swamp Store on okefenokeejoe.com.    

 

     There was a small pond near my house on Cowhouse Island.  I called it Swampy Lake.  And almost every day I would see alligators, turtles, snakes, egrets, great blue herons, anhingas, and song birds of all kinds in and around it.  There was an old cypress log sticking up out of the water that often had as many nineteen  fresh water turtles of different species sunning themselves upon it.  And once, in that pond I witnessed something that I found hard to believe at first.

     It was four small, still yellow downed ducklings swimming slowly in single file.  They were all spaced exactly the same distance from each other.  I have no idea where their mamma was.  It was remarkable that they were in such a perfect  formation as that.  But more remarkable was the fact that swimming behind them, at the same pace as the ducklings, and spaced exactly the same distance from them as they were from each other, was their arch enemy!  A six foot long American Alligator!

     Thinking that possibly the gator was after the ducklings, I watched them for quite a while.  They continued swimming in formation like that, until they reached the other side of the pond.  At which time they separated, and the ducklings began feeding on tadpoles at the water's edge.  It looked as if it had merely escorted those little ducklings across the pond, because then the gator disappeared!   A moment later just its eyes and its nose appeared above the water about twenty feet  from the ducklings. That alligator could have eaten all four of those little ducklings in one meal.  But it did not do that.  It did not even touch one of them!   Now an alligator, like all wild animals, is an opportunist, and knowing alligators the way I do, I am sure that gator was not just being a “Mr. Good Guy” by watching over them and doing his “good deed” for the day.  I believe that gator's belly was full at the moment, and it was not feeling hunger.

But it was going to watch over those little ducks to keep some other predator from getting to them.  It was just being “Swampwise”, and “saving them for later”!

      One of the year around residents in the swamplands of South Georgia is a peculiar bird known as an anhinga, and I'd see the same one just about every day somewhere in or near that pond.  I called him, “Hingy”!  Because, to me, when he'd sing his song it sounded like a low pitched..anhinga sound.. “Hingeee hingee hingee!”  He was a strange looking bird, and his habits were unlike any other bird around my pond.  Or, for that matter, anywhere!  The Indian tribes of the southeast look upon the Anhinga with a great deal of respect.  They feel it has strong medicine!  And I agree!  It's not your ordinary, every day bird, that's for sure!

       Most birds have got glands in their skin that secret an oil that keeps their feathers dry, whether it rains or not.  The anhinga doesn't have those glands, and when it comes up out of the water it's feathers are soaking and sopping wet!  It will climb up onto a branch of a tree or a bush somewhere, and stretch it's

wings out to dry in the sun.  Because its neck is much longer than all other 'fish eating' birds it looks somewhat awkward and out of place.   

      And unlike any other bird an Anhinga can actually fly under water!  Using it's wings to propel itself forward, it can move fast enough under water to catch a fish in it's beak!  It comes to the surface with it, and swallows it!  And when it swims, unlike any other bird, it's body stays under the surface of the water.  Only it's neck, and it's head are visible above the water!  As it paddles along, it's long gawky neck, moves it's head back and forth in a jerking motion, and it resembles a snake out there in the water.  Some people call it “The snake bird”!

     Every day in the Okefenokee was filled with awesome and adventurous sights and scenes.  Over and over again I thanked God for bringing me there, and allowing me to live there so close to the earth.  It's not only a paradise for all the native plants and animals that live there.  It was paradise for me too!  And I really loved hangin' around my pond!

 

~ Okefenokee Joe Enterprise

 
 

 

 

Okefenokee Joe 1932 - 2023

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